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DTS-HD Master Audio Suite 2.60.22 20: Features, Benefits, and Drawbacks of the Professional Audio Software
























DTS-HD Master Audio Suite 2.60.22 20: A Comprehensive Review




If you are looking for a professional audio production toolset for Blu-ray Disc, DVD, or streaming media, you might want to consider the DTS-HD Master Audio Suite. This software package allows you to encode, edit , and play back audio files in various DTS formats, including the lossless DTS-HD Master Audio. In this article, we will review the DTS-HD Master Audio Suite 2.60.22 20, the latest version of the software, and see what it can do for you. We will also compare it with other audio formats and discuss its pros and cons.




dts-hd master audio suite 2.60.22 20



Introduction




DTS-HD Master Audio Suite is a software package that consists of three main components: the DTS Encoder, the DTS StreamTools, and the DTS StreamPlayer. These components work together to provide you with a complete solution for creating and delivering high-quality audio content for Blu-ray Disc, DVD, or streaming media.


The DTS Encoder allows you to encode audio files in various DTS formats, such as DTS Digital Surround, DTS-ES, DTS 96/24, DTS-HD High Resolution Audio, DTS-HD Master Audio, and DTS:X. You can adjust the encoding settings and parameters to suit your needs and preferences, such as bitrate, sample rate, channel layout, dialog normalization, dynamic range control, and metadata. You can also preview and verify the encoded files before saving them.


The DTS StreamTools allows you to edit and manipulate DTS streams in various ways. You can perform operations such as join/replace, append, trim, split, add silence, and timecode restripe on multiple streams at once. You can also export and import DTS streams to and from other formats, such as WAV, AIFF, PCM, or BWF.


The DTS StreamPlayer allows you to play back DTS streams in real time on your computer. You can monitor the audio quality and metadata of the streams, as well as switch between different audio streams on a disc or a file. You can also use the DTS StreamPlayer to test your encoded files on different playback devices and configurations.


The main features and benefits of using the DTS-HD Master Audio Suite are:


  • High-quality audio encoding and decoding: The DTS-HD Master Audio Suite supports the lossless DTS-HD Master Audio format, which delivers the same quality as the original master recording. This format preserves every detail and nuance of the sound, without any compression or degradation. The DTS-HD Master Audio Suite also supports other high-quality DTS formats, such as DTS-HD High Resolution Audio and DTS:X, which offer immersive and realistic sound experiences.



  • Fast and efficient workflow: The DTS-HD Master Audio Suite allows you to encode, edit, and play back audio files in a seamless and streamlined manner. You can easily switch between different components of the software without losing your work or settings. You can also batch process multiple files at once, saving you time and effort.



  • Backward compatibility and flexibility: The DTS-HD Master Audio Suite ensures that your audio content is compatible with various playback devices and platforms. The software automatically creates a core stream that is compatible with legacy devices that support only standard DTS formats. You can also choose from different encoding options and profiles to optimize your audio content for different scenarios and purposes.



The system requirements and compatibility of the DTS-HD Master Audio Suite are:


  • Operating system: Windows 7 or later (64-bit)



  • Processor: Intel Core 2 Duo or equivalent



  • Memory: 4 GB RAM or more



  • Hard disk space: 500 MB or more



  • Sound card: ASIO-compatible sound card



  • Optical drive: Blu-ray Disc or DVD drive (optional)



  • Internet connection: Required for activation and updates



How to Use DTS-HD Master Audio Suite




DTS Encoder




The DTS Encoder is the component of the software that allows you to encode audio files in various DTS formats. To use the DTS Encoder, you need to follow these steps:


  • Launch the DTS Encoder from the Start menu or the desktop shortcut.



  • Select File > New Project to create a new project.



  • Select File > Add Source File(s) to add one or more audio files that you want to encode. You can also drag and drop files from Windows Explorer.



  • Select Project > Encoding Options to choose the encoding format and settings for your project. You can select from predefined profiles or customize your own settings.



  • Select Project > Metadata Options to enter or edit the metadata for your project. Metadata is information that describes your audio content, such as title, artist, genre, language, etc.



  • Select Project > Encode Project to start encoding your project. You can choose the destination folder and file name for the encoded file.



  • Select File > Save Project to save your project for future use or modification.



You can also use the DTS Encoder to preview and verify your encoded files. To do this, you need to follow these steps:


  • Select File > Open Project to open an existing project or create a new one.



  • Select Project > Preview Project to listen to your encoded file in real time. You can use the playback controls and the volume slider to adjust the playback.



  • Select Project > Verify Project to check the integrity and quality of your encoded file. The software will compare the encoded file with the source file and report any errors or discrepancies.



DTS StreamTools




The DTS StreamTools is the component of the software that allows you to edit and manipulate DTS streams in various ways. To use the DTS StreamTools, you need to follow these steps:


  • Launch the DTS StreamTools from the Start menu or the desktop shortcut.



  • Select File > Open Stream(s) to open one or more DTS streams that you want to edit. You can also drag and drop files from Windows Explorer.



  • Select Edit > Select All or use the mouse to select the streams or parts of streams that you want to edit.



  • Select Edit > Join/Replace, Append, Trim, Split, Add Silence, or Timecode Restripe to perform the desired operation on the selected streams. You can also use the keyboard shortcuts or the toolbar buttons for these operations.



  • Select File > Save Stream(s) As to save the edited streams as new files. You can choose the destination folder and file name for the new files.



You can also use the DTS StreamTools to export and import DTS streams to and from other formats, such as WAV, AIFF, PCM, or BWF. To do this, you need to follow these steps:


  • Select File > Open Stream(s) to open one or more DTS streams that you want to export or import.



  • Select File > Export Stream(s) As or Import Stream(s) From to choose the format and settings for exporting or importing. You can select from predefined profiles or customize your own settings.



  • Select File > Save Stream(s) As to save the exported or imported streams as new files. You can choose the destination folder and file name for the new files.



DTS StreamPlayer




The DTS StreamPlayer is the component of the software that allows you to play back DTS streams in real time on your computer. To use the DTS StreamPlayer, you need to follow these steps:


  • Launch the DTS StreamPlayer from the Start menu or the desktop shortcut.



  • Select File > Open Stream(s) to open one or more DTS streams that you want to play back. You can also drag and drop files from Windows Explorer.



  • Select Playback > Play/Pause, Stop, Previous, Next, Fast Forward, Rewind, Loop, Shuffle, or Repeat to control the playback of the streams. You can also use the keyboard shortcuts or the toolbar buttons for these commands.



  • Select View > Audio Quality Monitor, Metadata Monitor, Timecode Monitor, Bitrate Monitor, Channel Layout Monitor, or Audio Format Monitor to view various information about the streams, such as audio quality, metadata, timecode, bitrate, channel layout, and audio format. You can also use the keyboard shortcuts or the toolbar buttons for these commands.



  • Select Playback > Switch Audio Stream to switch between different audio streams on a disc or a file. You can also use the keyboard shortcuts or the toolbar buttons for this command.



Pros and Cons of DTS-HD Master Audio Suite




Pros




The DTS-HD Master Audio Suite has many advantages that make it a great choice for audio production and delivery. Some of the pros are:


  • High-quality audio encoding and decoding: The DTS-HD Master Audio Suite supports the lossless DTS-HD Master Audio format, which delivers the same quality as the original master recording. This format preserves every detail and nuance of the sound, without any compression or degradation. The DTS-HD Master Audio Suite also supports other high-quality DTS formats, such as DTS-HD High Resolution Audio and DTS:X, which offer immersive and realistic sound experiences.



  • Fast and efficient workflow: The DTS-HD Master Audio Suite allows you to encode, edit, and play back audio files in a seamless and streamlined manner. You can easily switch between different components of the software without losing your work or settings. You can also batch process multiple files at once, saving you time and effort.



  • Backward compatibility and flexibility: The DTS-HD Master Audio Suite ensures that your audio content is compatible with various playback devices and platforms. The software automatically creates a core stream that is compatible with legacy devices that support only standard DTS formats. You can also choose from different encoding options and profiles to optimize your audio content for different scenarios and purposes.



Cons




The DTS-HD Master Audio Suite also has some drawbacks that might make it less appealing for some users. Some of the cons are:


  • High price tag: The DTS-HD Master Audio Suite is not a cheap software package. It costs $1,495 for a single license, which might be too expensive for some users, especially hobbyists or beginners. You also need to pay an additional fee for updates or upgrades.



  • Limited support for digital optical or coaxial connections: The DTS-HD Master Audio Suite does not support digital optical or coaxial connections for playback. You need to use HDMI or analog connections to play back your encoded files on your home theater system. This might limit your options and compatibility with some devices.



  • Steep learning curve for beginners: The DTS-HD Master Audio Suite is not a very user-friendly software package. It has a complex and cluttered interface, with many options and settings that might confuse or overwhelm beginners. You need to have some prior knowledge and experience with audio encoding and editing to use the software effectively.



Comparison with Other Audio Formats




Dolby TrueHD




Dolby TrueHD is another lossless audio format that competes with DTS-HD Master Audio. It is also used for Blu-ray Disc, DVD, or streaming media production and delivery. Here are some similarities and differences between the two formats:


  • Similarities:



  • Both formats deliver the same quality as the original master recording, without any compression or degradation.



  • Both formats support up to 7.1 channels of surround sound, with a maximum bitrate of 18 Mbps.



  • Both formats are backward compatible with legacy devices that support only standard Dolby Digital or DTS formats.



  • Both formats can be encoded using similar software tools, such as Dolby Media Producer Suite or DTS-HD Master Audio Suite.



  • Differences:



  • Dolby TrueHD supports up to 24-bit/192 kHz audio resolution, while DTS-HD Master Audio supports up to 24-bit/96 kHz audio resolution.



  • Dolby TrueHD supports Dolby Atmos, an object-based audio format that adds height channels to create a more immersive sound field, while DTS-HD Master Audio does not support Dolby Atmos.



  • Dolby TrueHD has a wider availability and compatibility than DTS-HD Master Audio, as it is supported by more devices and platforms, such as Xbox One, PlayStation 4, Apple TV 4K, Netflix, Amazon Prime Video, etc.



The advantages and disadvantages of each format are:


Format Advantages Disadvantages --- --- --- Dolby TrueHD - Higher audio resolution- Support for Dolby Atmos- Wider availability and compatibility - Larger file size- Limited support for digital optical or coaxial connections- More expensive licensing fee DTS-HD Master Audio - Smaller file size- Support for DTS:X- More user-friendly encoding software - Lower audio resolution- No support for Dolby Atmos- Less availability and compatibility The use cases and scenarios for each format are:


  • Dolby TrueHD is more suitable for users who want the highest possible audio quality and resolution, and who have devices and platforms that support Dolby Atmos and Dolby TrueHD.



  • DTS-HD Master Audio is more suitable for users who want a balance between audio quality and file size, and who have devices and platforms that support DTS:X and DTS-HD Master Audio.



Other DTS Formats




Besides DTS-HD Master Audio, there are other DTS formats that are used for different purposes and scenarios. Here is an overview of these formats:


Format Features Specifications Compatibility --- --- --- --- DTS Digital Surround - The standard DTS format for DVD, Blu-ray Disc, or streaming media- Supports up to 5.1 channels of surround sound- Provides a high-quality and immersive sound experience - Bitrate: Up to 1.5 Mbps- Sample rate: 48 kHz- Resolution: 16-bit or 24-bit- Channel layout: L, R, C, LFE, Ls, Rs - Compatible with most devices and platforms that support DTS formats- Can be encoded using DTS-HD Master Audio Suite or other software tools DTS-ES - An extension of DTS Digital Surround that adds a rear center channel for a more realistic sound field- Supports two modes: DTS-ES Matrix and DTS-ES Discrete- DTS-ES Matrix encodes the rear center channel into the left and right surround channels, while DTS-ES Discrete encodes it as a separate channel - Bitrate: Up to 1.5 Mbps- Sample rate: 48 kHz- Resolution: 16-bit or 24-bit- Channel layout: L, R, C, LFE, Ls, Rs, Rc (DTS-ES Discrete) or L, R, C, LFE, Ls+Rc, Rs+Rc (DTS-ES Matrix) - Compatible with devices and platforms that support DTS-ES formats- Can be encoded using DTS-HD Master Audio Suite or other software tools DTS 96/24 - An extension of DTS Digital Surround that supports higher sample rate and resolution for DVD-Audio or DVD-Video production and playback- Provides a better audio quality and fidelity than standard DTS formats - Bitrate: Up to 1.5 Mbps- Sample rate: 96 kHz- Resolution: 24-bit- Channel layout: L, R, C, LFE, Ls, Rs - Compatible with devices and platforms that support DTS 96/24 formats- Can be encoded using DTS-HD Master Audio Suite or other software tools DTS-HD High Resolution Audio - A high-quality DTS format that supports up to 7.1 channels of surround sound for Blu-ray Disc or streaming media production and playback- Provides a better audio quality and fidelity than standard DTS formats, but not as good as lossless formats- Uses a lossy compression algorithm that preserves most of the original sound information - Bitrate: Up to 6 Mbps- Sample rate: Up to 96 kHz- Resolution: Up to 24-bit- Channel layout: Up to 8 channels (L, R, C, LFE, Ls, Rs, Lb, Rb) - Compatible with devices and platforms that support DTS-HD High Resolution Audio formats- Can be encoded using DTS-HD Master Audio Suite or other software tools DTS:X - An object-based audio format that supports up to 11.1 channels of surround sound for Blu-ray Disc or streaming media production and playback- Provides an immersive and realistic sound experience that adapts to the speaker configuration and the listener's position- Uses a lossless compression algorithm that preserves the original sound information - Bitrate: Up to 18 Mbps- Sample rate: Up to 96 kHz- Resolution: Up to 24-bit- Channel layout: Up to 12 channels (L , R, C, LFE, Ls, Rs, Lb, Rb, Ltm, Rtm, Vh) - Compatible with devices and platforms that support DTS:X formats- Can be encoded using DTS-HD Master Audio Suite or other software tools


Conclusion




In conclusion, the DTS-HD Master Audio Suite 2.60.22 20 is a professional audio production toolset that allows you to encode, edit, and play back audio files in various DTS formats, including the lossless DTS-HD Master Audio. It offers many features and benefits, such as high-quality audio encoding and decoding, fast and efficient workflow, backward compatibility and flexibility. However, it also has some drawbacks, such as high price tag, limited support for digital optical or coaxial connections, and steep learning curve for beginners.


If you are looking for a software package that can help you create and deliver high-quality audio content for Blu-ray Disc, DVD, or streaming media, you might want to consider the DTS-HD Master Audio Suite. It is a powerful and versatile software package that can meet your audio production needs and preferences. However, you should also be aware of its limitations and requirements before you buy it.


If you want to learn more about the DTS-HD Master Audio Suite or download a free trial version, you can visit the official website of DTS here: [text]. You can also find more information and support for the software on the website.


FAQs




Here are some frequently asked questions and answers about the DTS-HD Master Audio Suite:


  • What is the difference between DTS-HD Master Audio and DTS-HD High Resolution Audio?DTS-HD Master Audio and DTS-HD High Resolution Audio are both high-quality DTS formats that support up to 7.1 channels of surround sound. However, DTS-HD Master Audio is a lossless format that delivers the same quality as the original master recording, while DTS-HD High Resolution Audio is a lossy format that preserves most of the original sound information. Therefore, DTS-HD Master Audio has a higher audio quality and fidelity than DTS-HD High Resolution Audio.



  • How can I play DTS-HD Master Audio on my home theater system?To play DTS-HD Master Audio on your home theater system, you need to have a device that supports the format, such as a Blu-ray Disc player or a streaming media player. You also need to have a receiver or a soundbar that supports the format, such as a DTS:X compatible receiver or soundbar. You need to connect your device and your receiver or soundbar using an HDMI cable or an analog connection. You cannot use a digital optical or coaxial connection to play DTS-HD Master Audio.



What are the advantages of using DTS-HD Master Audio for Blu-ray Disc production?Using DTS-HD Master Audio for Blu-ray Disc production has several advantages, such as:


  • It provides a high-quality and immersive sound experience for your audience.



It preserves every detail and


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